Creating a Résumé from Scratch


Dear, Anita,

Recent graduate here. I have filled out job applications in the past but I’ve never had to create a résumé before, and I don’t know where to start. It seems intimidating. Can you point me in the right direction?

Dear, Résumé Newbie,

Person Holding ResumeAccording to Dictionary.com, a résumé is a brief written account of personal, educational, and professional qualifications and experience… prepared by an applicant for a job. With your recent school report-writing experience, this should be a snap. Think you don’t have enough to fill a page? C’mon, I’m sure you learned to stretch your thoughts to get to the word requirement for all those English essays.

I think Dictionary.com has the order backwards, though. If you have had any work experience at all, lead with that, followed by your education, with personal details at the bottom.

For your employment history, list the company name, date range of employment, and your job duties and responsibilities. Include summer jobs, babysitting gigs, stints as camp counselor, unpaid internships and yes, working in a family business even if paid only with your room and board.

What to do if you have absolutely zero employment history and are looking for your very first job? Beef up the education areas and mention classes that relate to your desired field (include grades, if they are stellar), outline any projects or reports that may be relevant, as well as any useful skills that you picked up along the way.  In fact, if you are particularly tech-savvy, break out “Computer Skills” as a subhead and list the programs in which you are well-versed.

Woman holding resume for a job interviewYou can bulk up a beginner’s résumé with personal information, such as skills, clubs, interests, awards, and community service. See my “Including Volunteer Work in Your Resume” post for more tips along these lines.

Another section to consider adding is References. “References upon request” is often seen on the bottom of jam-packed résumés, but for those without a “grip” of employment history, including the name and contact information for past teachers, bosses, church elders, or family friends who will give a glowing testimonial about your character is worth the space.

As for the format, keep it simple. Tempting as it may be to pimp out your résumé with a graphics program, many companies and job search sites such as Monster.com may require you to submit your résumé as a Word document. Word has dozens of résumé templates that you may download to give you a clean, professional look.

If you find you are not having success landing interviews, consider a professional résumé writing service such as CareerPerfect that can polish your rhinestone in the rough.

Readers: Readers, remember your first résumé? Did you learn anything about résumé-writing that can help our recent graduate?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

Top 10 Interview Fails


Dear, Anita,

I just sent a follow-up letter to a highly desired position I applied for by email using a draft for another industry. Unfortunately, I didn’t make all necessary changes that apply and cannot stop beating myself for this silly mistake on such a grand opportunity. Any words of comfort?

Dear, Oopsy Daisy,

There, there; everything will be all right. Seriously, don’t be too hard on yourself. We’ve all made mistakes before we hit the “send” button. It won’t be your only grand opportunity and maybe not even the best one for you.

Oops keyYou may be wondering if you should send a follow-up email apologizing for the error. I would not. Who knows? The recipient of the email may not have even noticed your mistake, and calling attention to it would not be wise in that case. If they did notice it, it will either be significant (and they won’t call you back because of a perceived lack of attention to detail) or it won’t (in which case your bringing it back up will mean nothing – or it will make them change their mind about its significance).

So, take the lesson (proofread everything twice before sending), and move on.

To make you feel better about your smallish error, here – in no particular order – are 10 interview fails I have seen in my ample years.

  1. Bringing your boyfriend to an interview. Or your mother. Or your kids. If you need a ride, get dropped off. The few dollars you spend on a babysitter is money well spent toward your career.
  2. Arriving for an interview with a cup of coffee in hand. While Starbucks would be proud to have infiltrated the interview space, this is not a casual chat with your best bud.
  3. Wearing flip-flops. No matter how relaxed the work environment, dress appropriately and professionally. Interview outfits should be a notch above what you’d wear once you land the job. (Side note: I once interviewed a college student who committed both #2 and #3.)
  4. Answering phone or texting during an interview. Cell phones should be silenced and out of view, and for goodness sake, take off your Bluetooth earpiece.
  5. Trash-talking your former boss or co-workers. While you may not be able to take grandma’s advice, “If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all,” frame your responses about your less-than-perfect previous jobs in neutral language.
  6. Showing up late. Take traffic into account when planning for your appointment. If you arrive too early, drive around the block so you’re not staring through the office window at your interviewer.
  7. Showing up deathly ill. An interview is an important meeting not to miss, but nobody wants to share the air with a walking Petri dish. Call and let the interviewer choose to reschedule or not.
  8. “Ummm, I’m, like, such a people person, ya know?” Practice answering interview questions with a friend to minimize your speech idiosyncrasies.
  9. Interrupting. Curb your enthusiasm and wait for the interviewer to finish his or her thought or question. Just like on the Jeopardy, if you buzz in too early, you’ll likely lose points.
  10. Acting desperate. Telling the hiring manager that you really need the job, or sharing your financial hardships will backfire. Just as in dating, desperation is a turn-off for employers. Self-confidence will bring respect, while sad sack stories will just bring pity.

Readers: Don’t be shy! Share your interview faux pas.

Need some job advice? Anita Clew is happy to help. Click here to Ask Anita.

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Graduates: Attempt Temping


Dear, Anita,

I just graduated from college with a degree in business. But I have no idea what I really want to do! I’m paralyzed with fear that I’ll start down the wrong career path and wind up doing something I hate. What should I do?

Dear, Dazed Diploma Holder,

GraduatesIt’s only natural to feel some trepidation as you begin your job search and your career. But rest assured, you’ll never be stuck in a bad situation – career or otherwise – unless you choose to be.  You can always change jobs. And life is funny; even if you did have your one-year, five-year, and 25-year career goals all nicely laid out, fate often has a different plan.

So just get started! Here’s a great excerpt from Careerealism on why you may want to consider a temporary job.

“Some job seekers are hesitant to accept temporary or contract assignments because they are concerned if they commit to something short-term, they will miss out on opportunities for full-time assignments. This may be a bit short-sighted because many employers are now using staffing agencies (and sometimes internal recruiters) to ‘try before they buy’ job candidates.

In many cases, short-term assignments are being extended and even becoming full-time opportunities for some workers.

If you’re currently unemployed, determine if this assignment could give you some valuable income and also help build your resume. If you can answer ‘yes’ to both of these items, it might be worth accepting the assignment. If you do a good job, you may also be able to obtain a reference for future employers.”

Read the entire blog post at http://www.careerealism.com/job-seekers-temp-jobs/#rfDuA8cQybt8SwJV.99

While the blog mentions that employers can “try before they buy” job candidates, you as the job seeker can “try on” different positions to see what interests you and suits your personality best.

Readers: Readers, what was your first job out of college? Did it prepare you for your dream career?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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How to Brag – Nicely


Dear, Anita,

I am currently assigned to a local company through a temporary agency. This company hires temps first and then decides whether or not to hire permanent. I work 3rd shift, so there is less opportunity to be noticed by management. I am tempted to email my supervisor and “toot my own horn,” as I have never been late or absent, have done every job happily, and even volunteer for overtime. I tend to get overshadowed by more aggressive people, and I don’t want to be overlooked here. How do I bring all this positive info to his attention without sounding like an insufferable braggart? Thanks.

Dear, Bragger Lagger,

Businessman Speaking Through MegaphoneThe great boxer Muhammed Ali once said – and I paraphrase – it ain’t bragging if it’s true. (He also said, “It’s hard to be humble when you’re as great as I am,” but I’m not including that attitude in my advice.) In the world of employment, you’re going to have to man up and boast amiably about your strengths and accomplishments, whether writing cover letters and résumés, while interviewing, and, after you get the job, when asking for a raise.

But there is a fine line between confidence and “supercalifragilisticexpi-braggadocious.” You do need to let your employer know what you have to offer, but not in an egotistical way.

Be pleasantly self-assured. When talking about yourself, add a dash of humbleness. Avoid words like “best” (unless you really did win the “Best Fill-In-Job-Title of the Year” award). When you’re outlining your triumphs and accomplishments, this type of communication often comes across better in person rather than via e-mail (the obvious exception would be your résumé).

Provide evidence. If you say, “I’m a great motivator,” how can that be proven? Reconstruct your statement with specific examples from your past experience. Say something like, “I’ve always had success motivating others by doing X, Y, and Z.”

It’s not about you. It’s about how you can help the new employer. To avoid appearing self-centered, say “we” often to show you’re a team player (remember the axiom, “There’s no ‘I’ in team.”). Chances are you can’t really take full credit for everything on your résumé, unless you were literally a one-person entrepreneurial operation.

Let others boast for you. Bring up comments from co-workers, performance evaluations, and thank you notes or testimonials. “At my last review, my supervisor told me that…” or “A customer recently posted a great review on Yelp after we… ”

Answer questions directly and concisely. Sometimes droning on and on is a nervous habit during in an interview, but it could make you come across as someone who just loves the sound of his own voice. A shy person who avoids eye contact could be misconstrued as having a haughty or condescending attitude.

Avoid other signs that you’re cocky: name-dropping, one-upping, using five-dollar words when a 50-cent word will do, interrupting often, bad-mouthing others (former employers, co-workers, the bad driver who made you late), and to that last example, not accepting any blame. Showing a little vulnerability is not a bad thing. Why else do you think hiring managers ask that double-edged question, “What is your greatest strength and your greatest weakness?”

Whatever you say, be sure it’s true so this quip won’t apply to you: “With a braggart, it’s no sooner done than said.”–Evan Esar

Readers: Have you ever felt the need to brag about yourself to your manager because you don’t feel he/she has noticed your job well done? How did you handle it? 

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Online Reputation Monitoring


Dear, Anita,

I’m a hiring manager at a company, and I would like to let people know that many HR professionals routinely screen applicants online, checking out not just LinkedIn but Facebook, Twitter, and Google searches. You’d be shocked and amazed at some of the things I’ve seen about job candidates! I don’t have a question; I just think job seekers should be aware of this.

Dear, Undercover Recruiter,

Eye on Computer MonitorThank you for the reminder. Readers, your social (media) life could be killing your career. Every tweet, post, hashtag, comment, profile, and photo on the Internet is adding to or detracting from your online reputation. According to a recent CareerBuilder study, 43 percent of hiring managers who researched candidates via social media found something that caused them not to hire an individual. The top no-nos: posting provocative/inappropriate photos (50%), discussing drinking/drug use (48%), and badmouthing a previous employer (33%). Even if you don’t have half-naked photos of yourself online, something as innocuous as typos in your posts could reflect poorly on you.

Here’s how to manage your online reputation.

Google yourself. Note that some browsers may save information about you, so search from a public computer to be sure you’re getting the same results a potential employer will see. Check all of your name variations (Richard, Dick, etc.), but especially the one you use on your résumé.

Beware of online doppelgangers. If another person with your same name has a poor reputation, be prepared to combat this. If this person has a criminal record, paying a reputation management firm may be the answer. Sign up for Google Alerts with your name to be sure that you’re aware of any news stories about murderers, child molesters, and the like who a potential employer could confuse with you. Another way to contend with the doppelganger effect is to purchase a web domain of your name (if available). On your own website, you can create links to your LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook accounts and include this URL in your cover letter and resume.

Post judiciously. We tell teenagers not to post anything they wouldn’t want Grandma – or Miss Anita! – to see. Now that you’re all grown up, don’t post anything you would want a potential employer to see (review the top three faux pas in the first paragraph). Avoid oversharing (TMI!). Mind what groups you join. Even your extreme political views or a preponderance of snarky comments may have an adverse effect on your career. And let’s hash over #hashtags; don’t post #myjobsucks, #drinktilyoudrop, or anything similar. If you really must have a salty social media record of your shenanigans, you may want to create a separate account under a pseudonym.

Change your privacy settings. Check your Facebook settings to make sure that all of your personal posts are not “Public.” Watch what your friends post, too. Enable timeline and tagging review so that you can approve (or not) your buddies’ ill-conceived tags and posts before they hit your wall. Protect your tweets on Twitter to approve the people who may view your 140-character gems. Consider making your Instagram, Tumblr, and Flickr photos private. Use Secret Boards on Pinterest for your more risqué pins, or go to your settings and change the Search Privacy under your Basic Information. Since LinkedIn is basically Facebook for the job world, it may be an exception to my stringent privacy rules. However, be careful not to connect with people you really do not know. And if you want to keep your new job search on the QT, here are some LinkedIn privacy tips from InformationWeek.

Unwanted content still showing up in a search? Do what companies concerned about their SEO do: bury it. New content will push the old mistakes further down the search list. And, really, how many times have you gone to page 3 or 4 of the search results?

Establish credibility and visibility. Use a blog to make yourself an expert in your field. Your blog will be an asset that will follow you from job to job. Post comments and share articles on LinkedIn groups. Even if you don’t have a doppelganger to worry about, consider creating your own personal website with professional content. Post in the comments below if you’d like me to devote an upcoming blog post to the subject of creating your own personal brand website and blog.

Readers: How do you handle the privacy settings on your social media accounts?

World’s Worst Jobs


Dear, Anita,

I have the worst job in the world. My boss is demanding and yells all the time, I often have to work late to meet unreasonable deadlines, and I don’t get paid what I deserve. Of course, I found this all out AFTER I went to work for the company. How can I make sure I get into a better job next time?

Dear, Grass is Greener,

You are not alone. As a matter of fact, 70 percent of Americans are “not engaged” or are “actively disengaged” with their jobs, according to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace study. It does sound like you have several reasons for being unhappy in your current situation. However, remember the old adage… “Better the devil you know than the devil you don’t.” Sometimes, you may have it better than you thought.

For example, check out the #WorldsToughestJob interview that has gone viral:

This job requires 24/7 work weeks. No vacation. No salary. Wait… what? This “Director of Operations” job description from American Greetings, while quite accurate, is not an apples-to-apples comparison to your for-pay job.

But even according to the recently released 2014 Jobs Rated report from CareerCast, you don’t have the worst job in the world. That dubious honor goes to lumberjacks, who work outdoors in extreme weather conditions operating dangerous machinery that could cause bodily injury – all for $24K a year. Other jobs in the bottom 10 include:

  • Newspaper reporter – job growth is declining as more print publications go defunct
  • Broadcaster – highly competitive and stressful
  • Firefighters and military personnel – duh… dangerous
  • Taxi driver – stressful and low pay
  • Head cook – imagine the nerve-racking lunch rush
  • Flight attendant – air rage
  • Garbage collector – no explanation needed

The Jobs Rated report also lists the Best Jobs of 2104, based on projected job growth, median salary, and working conditions. Have you got a degree? Many of the highest-rated jobs require higher education. The top 10 positions include mathematician, university professor, statistician, actuary, software engineer, computer systems analyst, occupational therapist, audiologist, speech pathologist, and dental hygienist (although I would argue that sticking your fingers in someone else’s mouth is not a great work environment). Click here for the full list of 200 rated jobs.

To check out a company before you accept another job offer, you may want to do a little snooping on Glassdoor.com. Here, employees can anonymously rate their companies and managers. Take this with a grain of salt, though, as we all know disgruntled workers tend to complain the loudest. Smaller mom-and-pop businesses may not show up on Glassdoor, so reconnoiter within your local network. Check LinkedIn also to see if you have any connections that you can chat with about a company’s culture.

But what may be a good fit for someone else may not work for you. Don’t just accept the first offer you receive just to get out of your current situation. Besides the obvious criteria of “can I do the job?” and “does it pay enough?”… consider your personal satisfaction, the company culture, and the opportunities for personal and professional growth.

Readers: How would you rate your job based on working climate, pay rate, and how you forecast the future of the position?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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ATS 101: Demystifying Applicant Tracking Systems


Dear, Anita,

I’ve heard that hiring managers don’t even look at your résumé anymore if it doesn’t go through a computer program first. How can computers decide if you would be a good fit for a job or not? I’m so tired of submitting résumés into a “black hole” and never hearing back.

Source: “2001: A Space Odyssey”

Source: “2001: A Space Odyssey”

Dear, Anti-HAL,

An Applicant Tracking System (ATS) is software that automates the recruiting process by sorting, filtering, ranking, and yes, tracking, job applicants and new hires. Many mid-size companies and the majority of all large corporations utilize candidate management systems. Every time you submit a résumé online, there’s a good chance it will go through ATS software.

From a sheer logistics standpoint, it saves HR professionals time. Put yourself in their shoes, particularly in the tight job market we’ve experienced in recent years. For every one job advertised, hiring managers could be deluged with hundreds of applications and résumés. Many applicants are simply unqualified for the given position. To narrow down this paper pile to find the top candidates with the skills, education, and experience necessary for this one open job is a daunting task. If you are hiring for numerous job openings in a large organization, this quickly becomes unmanageable.

One legal reason companies use ATS is to prevent discrimination. If an unbiased computer is sorting the résumés, companies can easily show they are complying with federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) laws.

How an ATS Works

Applicant Tracking Systems extrapolate information from résumés to put into common database fields, such as work experience, education, and contact information. When you apply for a particular job, it searches, just like Google, for keywords pertaining to the position’s criteria. It will sort through all résumés and assign each a score, ranking you compared to other applicants to a particular opening. Recruiters and hiring managers use this ranked list to find the candidates who will be the best fit – in theory – for the job. If your résumé is not one of the highest ranking, you won’t get an interview (and often not even an acknowledge­ment, as you have discovered).

To increase your chances of a better score, take the time to carefully sift through the job description and note keywords.  See how you can incorporate them into your résumé. Of course, you want to be honest and not add keywords for which you don’t have the qualifications. But sometimes it’s just a matter of apples to oranges. If your current title is marketing director, and you want to apply for a marketing manager position, keep your current title, but include the word “manage” into the description of your duties.

Be sure to fill out all the fields, so that the Applicant Tracking System won’t filter you out for that reason alone. If you have to import your résumé, take a few extra minutes to review before submitting. You don’t want odd formatting errors to hurt your chances.

So, while frustrating and more time consuming, you have to use keywords to jump though the HR hoop and get your résumé in front of human eyes. Since ATS programs have many automated features, it would be nice if companies would at least send a “we-got-your-résumé-don’t-call-us-we’ll-call-you” email. HAL, do you hear me?

Readers: How often do you tailor your résumé with keywords relevant to the position you are applying for?

My friends at The Select Family of Staffing Companies can save you the trouble of tailoring a résumé for each potential job. Once you’re in their database, the Personnel Supervisors will match you up with requests from temp and temp-to-hire employers.

One Long Job on Résumé


Dear, Anita,

After 27 years with the same company, I have been laid off after a merger. The problems is I have a very short résumé, since I’ve been at this job most of my career! How should I handle this?

OneDear, Long-Term Lola,

It used to be that people stayed at the same company long enough to get the gold watch at retirement. In our more mobile society, there has been a definite shift away from job longevity. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers have been with their current employer an average of 4.6 years. (I think there are some leftovers in my freezer older than that!)

First, I’m going to assume that your latest position is not the same one you started with at your (former) company. Break out each job title and list chronologically with the most recent first. You have a résumé advantage that serial job-hoppers don’t. You can go into much more detail about each position and what you accomplished there to move you up to the next level. Give measurable examples whenever possible (e.g., promoted to Sales Manager after increasing personal sales 37%). It’s important for a potential employer to see that you have not been stagnant before being thrown back into the labor pool.

If you have attended seminars over the years or received on-the-job training and cross-training, list all the credits and certificates that you have accumulated. Speaking of skills, this may be another subhead for you to add to your résumé template. List all the computer programs in which you are proficient, as well other industry-specific processes and procedures with which you are familiar.

If, by chance, you have been in the same position since Day 1, you’ll have to employ a tactic I recommend to newly minted graduates, and include extracurricular and volunteer activities on your résumé (see my blog, Including Volunteer Work In Your Resume).  In fact, if you are feeling your résumé is still a little thin, by all means mention that you organize the annual fund-raiser at your kids’ school or maintained the bookkeeping records for your local animal charity.

Take the opportunity to brag about your tenure in your previous position in your cover letter. Instead of apologizing for a lack of résumé bullet points under “Experience,” celebrate your longevity! Emphasize your loyalty, your stability, and your reliability. I am confident that the sum total of these character virtues is still sought after in the job marketplace.

Readers: How have you addressed working for only a few companies in your résumé and your job search?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Tattoos & Interviews


Dear, Anita,

I want to get a tattoo, but people (mostly my mother!) have been telling me it’s not a good idea because it will limit my career. I have a degree in accounting, and after putting in some time at my current entry-level position, I do plan to look for a better job in the near future. Everyone has tattoos these days; surely employers are used to this by now. Do you think a tattoo will hurt my future?

Dear, Thinking of Inking,

Adult male adjusting necktie.While 20 years ago tattoos were generally perceived as a statement of rebellion, body art is now becoming more mainstream. A recent Pew Research Study shows that 40% of adults age 26-40 have at least one tattoo. However, only 14% of all Americans of all ages have a tattoo, so there’s a good chance one of those 86% who don’t will be your interviewer!

In a Salary.com survey, more than one-third of the respondents believe employees with tattoos and piercings reflect poorly with employers, and 42% responded that visible tattoos are always inappropriate at work. Interestingly, the study found the more educated you are, the less likely you are to have (or condone) tattoos.  There are also regional biases, with the west-south-central area of the U.S. (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana) being the least tolerant of inked individuals. Hiring managers, while they themselves may not be biased, have to consider a tattooed employee’s interaction with customers, which could prevent you from getting a job.

Before you tattify, give careful consideration to the body art’s location. A tat on your lower back (known as a “tramp stamp” by the younger set) may never be seen in the course of a normal workday – unless you take a job as a lifeguard. Tattoo “sleeves,” however, are harder to cover day-to-day. If you are applying to a less-traditional company with a hip reputation, visible tattoos may not be as taboo.

To borrow a slogan from Internet marketing, “content is king.” Avoid a tattoo that portrays anything death-related (like skulls) as well as drug-related, racist, or sexually suggestive motifs. A butterfly may be more innocuous than a spider web tattooed on your neck. Check out this video from Global Image Group on preparing for a job interview with tattoos and piercings:

If you do pursue that tattoo, and later find it is limiting your career, tattoo removal is an option. But laser de-inking can be expensive. And while I surely can’t speak from experience, I hear that tattoo removal is more painful than the original process.

If I were you, I would be more concerned about boosting your skills and résumé, rather than your “street cred.”

Readers: What are your thoughts on tattoos in the workplace?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Career Change to STEM


Dear, Anita,

I understand women and men had been created similarly, but one particular question I could never uncover the solution to is why you can find a lot more males functioning as doctors, engineers, and scientists? The ratio of male: females is about ninety-nine to one. Why is this, and how can I as a woman change careers to get into one of these fields?

Woman DoctorDear, Marie Curie Wanna-Be,

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 34.3% of U.S. physicians are female, so women are gaining ground in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) fields. As to the why, we could discuss this for hours. There is an interesting nondiscriminatory take on the issue in this recent MSN News article: http://news.msn.com/science-technology/why-are-women-underrepresented-in-science-and-math-careers.

The days of working for one company in one career until you get a gold watch at retirement are long gone. But how many times do people change careers in their lifetime? The BLS estimates the average person holds 11.3 jobs from age 18-46. Of course, a change of jobs doesn’t necessarily mean a total change in your career choice.

But let’s talk nuts and bolts.  Making a drastic career change can be challenging, and double that if you’ve got kids to feed and bills to pay. So be as certain as you can be that this new career is something you will be passionate about, because you’ll need that enthusiasm to get you through the tough times.

Woman ScientistFirst, for a career in the fields you mentioned – medical, engineering, or scientific – you’ll need additional education. You didn’t mention your age (and it would be rude of me to ask!), but many of these fields take advanced degrees. I hope you have your bachelor’s behind you, or the process will take many more years. (Check out my past blog, Advanced Degrees While Employed, for tips on balancing work, life, and school.) You’ll need to narrow down your career choices to hone in on the focus for your educational efforts… and dollars.

Speaking of that, are you prepared to invest in your career change?  If you have previous student loans, are you willing to go into more debt? As an alternative to a full-blown master’s degree, you may look into certificate programs in the STEM fields (medical assistant, drafting, Microsoft certification, etc.), which may be completed more quickly and for a lower cost.

We’ve all heard stories about accountants turned bakers, and lawyers trying their hand at stand-up comedy. However, the easiest career changes are those in which you can transfer some of your current skills into your new path.  But don’t let that discourage you. For more inspiration, check out this NASA video:

Reader: Have you ever changed careers? What is the best piece of advice you can offer?

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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